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fgd-212 (Dimmer 2) Does it work without Sx ?


sirKitKat
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Hi,

 

I have several momentary switch points where I have a L & N wire and just one signal wire.to the dimmer module.

 

Is it possible to connect the Dimmer with only one signal wire and use the L or N on the switch instead of Sx?

 

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regards:

 

Klaas

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I would recommend connection From manual and connection N instead of Sx with one addition. Connect Sx to N. I tried it once and it worked, but it has to be on the same circuit.

Edited by jakub.jezek
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  • Oh, I see, so you put Sx and N on the same potential and using the N wire as the Sx wire.

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    (They are on the same fuse, without that, the fuse will go out because of the difference between in and out.)

    Edited by sirKitKat
    added drawing
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    I have no N where my device is located and only one signal wire. An other forum recommended using "L instead of Sx" and then connect N and Sx. I have a resistive load of 160 W.

    It works, but I am not sure it is the "right" may to do it.

    Seems that both L and N can be used instead of Sx, then? Not that I understand how this works...

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    I can confirm that L instead of Sx is an option. There are reasons why it may not work reliably, I can explain this if you want me to. To confirm what I say: take a multimeter and measure the resistance between L and Sx. You'll find out the resistance is almost zero, so they are virtually the same...

     

    In 2-wire setup (see manual!) L = Sx = N so in that case, but only in that case, they are all the same...

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  • @petergebruers I'm interested in why this will have an impact on reliability so I (and possible others) can prevent this instead of finding out the hard way.

     

    I did a short test with sx not connected and hitting the S1/S2 inputs with the L and N wire. I noticed that a button input was detected before I could touch the screws and that L or N wire doest make a difference in detecting an input.

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    2 minutes ago, sirKitKat said:

    @petergebruers I'm interested in why this will have an impact on reliability so I (and possible others) can prevent this instead of finding out the hard way.

     

    I did a short test with sx not connected and hitting the S1/S2 inputs with the L and N wire. I noticed that a button input was detected before I could touch the screws and that L or N wire doest make a difference in detecting an input.

     

    It is not that I want you to find out the hard way. I have tried to explain it to other users and I always have failed, I seem unable to bring across the message.

     

    So please just try it. A know of a few people, who have tried it and it works.

     

    This is the reason why switching may be unreliable: no current should run through wires that are connected to S1, S2 and Sx. If you obey the rules, Sx will essentially carry no current. Also S1 and S2 will carry no current (apart from the very small measuring current from the module, micro-amperes).

     

    If you use L instead of Sx there will always be a segment of wire, going to L/Sx and it will also carry current. This might throw off the detection of S1/S2.

     

    Just try I it. S1 and S2 are well protected, I promise you: you will not damage the module by connecting S1 or S2 to either N or L.

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    On 7/31/2017 at 3:42 PM, sirKitKat said:

    Oh, I see, so you put Sx and N on the same potential and using the N wire as the Sx wire.

    Please login or register to see this attachment.

     

    (They are on the same fuse, without that, the fuse will go out because of the difference between in and out.)

    Warning! I used the right diagram (Sx connected to N), and it led to a massive short circuit! So do not use that diagram!

    Luckily the dimmer survived.

    I solved the short by removing the wire between Sx and N. The switch is now connected between N and S1, and works. (Which is according to the third diagram, N instead of Sx).

    Edited by andrehj
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